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COMMENTARY
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 26

Commentary on “Increase in cerebral blood flow indicated by increased cerebral arterial area and pixel intensity on brain magnetic resonance angiogram following correction of cervical lordosis”


Takeda Pharmaceuticals International Co., Cambridge, MA, USA

Date of Web Publication27-Mar-2019

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Kenneth I Maynard
Takeda Pharmaceuticals International Co., 350 Massachusetts Avenue, RM 4102, Cambridge, MA, 02139
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2394-8108.255021

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How to cite this article:
Maynard KI. Commentary on “Increase in cerebral blood flow indicated by increased cerebral arterial area and pixel intensity on brain magnetic resonance angiogram following correction of cervical lordosis”. Brain Circ 2019;5:26

How to cite this URL:
Maynard KI. Commentary on “Increase in cerebral blood flow indicated by increased cerebral arterial area and pixel intensity on brain magnetic resonance angiogram following correction of cervical lordosis”. Brain Circ [serial online] 2019 [cited 2020 May 30];5:26. Available from: http://www.braincirculation.org/text.asp?2019/5/1/26/255021

Little is known about the influence of cervical spine curvature (cervical lordosis) and cerebral blood flow, but it has been reported that the loss of cervical lordosis results in a decrease in vertebral artery blood flow. The authors of this retrospective study, therefore, hypothesized that improvement of cervical hypolordosis via cervical adjustments would increase cerebral circulation. This is what the study showed; however, while the premise of the study is laudable, there are some challenges in interpreting the findings of this paper. First, there are no control data and very small sample size with a restricted age range of the study. This means that it is hard to make validated conclusions from this study, and as the authors indicate, further controlled, a priori studies with much larger patient populations and regions of cerebral blood flow are needed to confirm these findings and understand the clinical implications.




 

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